Corey Hart – “A Little Love”

“A Little Love” was released as the lead-off single for Corey Hart’s 1990 album, Bang! The single was released in early 1990 and peaked at number 37 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. “A Little Love” is the last pop hit that Corey Hart had in the United States.

I was in the ninth grade and about to turn 15 years old when this single was released. I’d liked some of Corey’s earlier material, such as “Sunglasses At Night” and “Never Surrender,” so it’s not surprising that I ended up liking “A Little Love” as well. It’s a fun, upbeat pop rock song that has a catchy chorus. At the time, it surprised me that the song didn’t fare better on the pop chart, but looking back, I can hear that it didn’t entirely fit in with the other songs being released at the time that became pop successes.

Unfortunately, I think the music video may not have done much to help the song, either. I hadn’t watched this video in nearly 25 years, and it amazed me just how low budget it looked. There were also some effects that were being used that seemed to be trying to emulate the effects from INXS’ “What You Need” video, and this ultimately dated the video. Looking at it now, it’s easy to tell that this music video came out in the late 1980s/early 1990s. The music video just didn’t age very well.

I am embedding the music video below, and I apologize in advance to any of my readers who are unable to view it due to region blocking.

Madonna – “Vogue”

“Vogue” was released as the first single from Madonna’s 1990 album, I’m Breathless – Music From and Inspired by the Film Dick Tracy. The single was released on March 20, 1990, and peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. “Vogue” was inspired by vogue dancers and choreographers Jose and Luis Xtravaganza from the Harlem “House Ball” community.

I was in the ninth grade, and a day away from turning 15 when this single was released. I loved the song from the first moment I heard it, both musically and lyrically. Musically, the song has its roots in early 1990s dance music, but you can also hear an influence of 1970s disco in it; the combination of these sounds really helped to make the song stand out in a good way. Lyrically, the song is about enjoying yourself on the dance floor no matter who you are, and it also has a theme of escapism. As a teenager, the lyrics really resonated with me, and I found the song to be rather anthemic. I also liked the spoken part where Madonna namechecks various golden age era Hollywood celebrities. 25 years later, “Vogue” still ranks among my favorite Madonna songs of all-time.

The music video was directed by David Fincher. It was shot in black and white and takes stylistic inspiration from the 1920s and 1930s. Throughout the video, Madonna and the dancers are seen voguing to different choreographed moves. I’ve always felt that this video perfectly captured the mood and feel of the song, and that it has a unique feel to it. I have to say that this is a music video that has managed to withstand the test of time, and it really doesn’t look that dated.

I am embedding the music video below, and I apologize in advance to any of my readers who are unable to view it due to region blocking.

Janet Jackson – “Alright”

“Alright” was released as the fourth single from Janet Jackson’s 1989 album, Janet Jackson’s Rhythm Nation 1814. The single was released on March 4, 1990, and peaked at number four on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

I was in the ninth grade and about to turn 15 years old when this single was released. It’s not surprising that I liked this song right away, considering how much I liked Janet’s material from both this album and the Control album. It’s a nice, upbeat track that has a musical arrangement that gets stuck in your head. From what I’ve learned recently, “Alright” actually includes samples from two different songs: “Think (About It)” by Lyn Collins and “Do You Like It” by B.T. Express. But learning this fact hasn’t diminished my appreciation for the song.

The music video is incredibly awesome. It was done as a kind of “mini musical movie,” with sets styled to resemble a 1930s and 1950s music, and featured cameo appearances from Cyd Charisse, The Nicholas Brothers, and Cab Calloway in one of his last on-screen appearances. The choreography for this video is so well done, and some the moves look absolutely incredible. I hadn’t seen this video in a long time, but I was just as impressed and blown away by this music video as I was 25 years ago. The video has really held up well over the years, and I would have to rank it up there among some of the best music videos to ever be produced.

I am embedding the music video below, and I apologize in advance to any of my readers who are unable to view it due to region blocking.

Expose – “Your Baby Never Looked Good In Blue”

“Your Baby Never Looked Good In Blue” was released as the fourth single from Expose’s 1989 album, What You Don’t Know. The single was released in March 1990 and peaked at number 17 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

I was in the ninth grade and about to turn 15 years old when this single was released. I really loved the simplicity of this song, especially the musical arrangement. The lyrics are from the point of view of someone who has learned their lover is rumored to have found someone new. While I hadn’t been in a relationship at that point in my life, I could still understand and feel the emotion of the song. The vocal performance also helped to reinforce the emotional aspect of the song.

MTV never aired a music video for this song when it was on the charts, so I assumed for many years that it never had one. So I was surprised to discover on YouTube that an official video was actually made. I suspect that Night Tracks may have aired it at the time, but someone I managed to miss seeing it on there. The video is pretty simplistic, and it combines performance footage of the trio with behind-the-scenes shots of the girls on tour. This leads me to believe that they were on tour at the time this single was released and couldn’t fit in an actual video shoot into their touring schedule. The video isn’t bad for what it is.

I am embedding the music video below, and I apologize in advance to any of my readers who are unable to view it due to region blocking.

The U-Krew – “If You Were Mine”

“If You Were Mine” was released as a single from The U-Krew’s 1989 self-titled debut album. The single was released in late 1989/early 1990 and peaked at number 21 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

While my local pop radio station didn’t play this particular song in its regular rotation, I heard it when it was part of Rick Dees’ syndicated Top 40 countdown show when my local station aired it on Sunday mornings. I think what grabbed me about this song was its music, because it was rather catchy. It’s one of those songs that you just have to move to when you hear it. Lyrically, it wasn’t anything special, but the music made up for that weakness. While I may not like this song quite as much as I did when I was 14 years old, I don’t see it as a terrible song.

I didn’t see the music video for this song at the time it was released, because MTV didn’t play it in the network’s regular rotation. So I saw this video for the first time recently on YouTube; after seeing it, I’m glad I didn’t see it at the time, because it might have turned me off to the song. Oh my God, this video is just so cheesy! Very cheap looking effects, and the video seems to reuse a bit of footage. Also, who told these guys that they looked good dressed in all zebra print? I’m sorry, but all that zebra print just adds to the cheesiness factor for this video. Yeah, this video looks incredibly dated and just didn’t pass the test of time. I can see why MTV didn’t play it during the network’s regular rotation at the time.

I am embedding the music video below, for any of my readers who may be brave enough to try to watch it. I apologize in advance for those who are unable to view the video due to region blocking.

M.C. Hammer – “U Can’t Touch This”

“U Can’t Touch This” was released as the lead-off single for M.C. Hammer’s 1990 album, Please Hammer Don’t Hurt ‘Em. The single was released on January 13, 1990, and peaked at number eight on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. The song samples the opening riff of Rick James’ “Super Freak.”

I was in the ninth grade when this single was released. It’s a catchy song, so it’s no wonder I liked it the first time I heard it on the radio. The lyrics may be a little on the cheesy side, but the music is pretty solid. Of course, the Rick James sample is one of the memorable parts of the song. 25 years later, “U Can’t Touch This” is still a guilty pleasure of mine. Of all of the songs that I know by M.C. Hammer, this one is my favorite.

The music video can be summed up in two words: “Hammer Pants.” Just kidding. It’s a video of M.C. Hammer and other people dancing to the song in various locations. Unfortunately, the video looks rather dated and doesn’t stand the test of time. The clothing, hairstyles, cinematography, and effects in this video just scream early 1990s. Oh well. It’s still a fun video that worked well at the time for such an upbeat danceable track.

I am embedding the music video below, and I apologize in advance to any of my readers who are unable to view the video due to region blocking.

Linear – “Sending All My Love”

“Sending All My Love” was released as the lead-off single from Linear’s 1990 self-titled debut album. The single was released on February 15, 1990, and it peaked at number five on the Billboard Hot 100.

I was 14 years old and in the ninth grade when this single was released. I fell in love with this fun and upbeat freestyle/pop song the very first time I heard it. There was just something about it that grabbed my interest immediately, and it became one of my favorite songs that I listened to during the spring of 1990. 25 years later, I still enjoy listening to this song as much as I did when I was a teenager. While it may sound a little dated now, it’s just so catchy that you can’t help but still enjoy it.

The music video was definitely aimed at teenagers in 1990. It featured footage of the group lip-synching the song inside a building intercut with footage of the band dancing in various locations. While I say the song itself sounds a little dated, I have to admit that the video looks even more dated than the song sounds. But the video is good for what it is, and it really worked well for this song.

I am embedding the music video below, and I apologize in advance to any of my readers who are unable to view it due to region blocking.